Re-vamp your e-mails in 2018

If optimising your brand’s email marketing program didn’t make your list of New Year’s resolutions, you may want to reconsider.

Posted 5 months ago by Martin Dew

If optimising your brand’s email marketing program didn’t make your list of New Year’s resolutions, you may want to reconsider. Email drives more return on investment than any other marketing channel. If 2018 is the year that you’re looking to boost your revenue and consumer engagement, revamping your email program is one of the most achievable ways to do so.

It’s hard to argue that receiving email is now often met with a groan. The reason? we’re inundated with emails with the average person receiving 121 a day. We don’t hate all email, just the ones we don’t want to read and the numbers agree with me. When it comes down to it, consumers still derive tangible benefits from email and marketers still get a real payback.

If you want your messages to land in the inbox rather than the spam folder and you want subscribers to appreciate and engage with our messages, 2018 is the time to revamp your email.

Set expectations.

Be clear about what subscribers are signing up for and make sure expectations align with reality.

Make a positive impression.

As a follow up, ensure that your email program delivers on the promises that you make.

Get a clear picture of the email lifecycle.

Review the complete subscriber lifecycle, from opt-in to opt-out and be sure that content and business rules are implemented.

Tidy up your UX.

A disjointed or clunky user experience can evoke a range of emotions, from mild frustration to downright rage.

Succinct, relevant copy.

Ensure that messaging communicates effectively.

Functionality.

As you review messages, be sure to click through each link to determine whether it directs users to the correct part of the site.

Subject lines.

Make the most of the subject line, shown as the most neglected part of the email from testing with the numerous on-line tools.

Segmentation and targeting

Move away from the “one size fits all” approach to email marketing. Consider using segmentation and personalisation to create versions of key messages that will resonate with specific groups of subscribers.

Pre-Header

Along with the subject line one of the most important parts of the email and often overlooked. It gives a second chance to enforce the message, so don’t just repeat the subject line. If the first thing in the header is “view in browser” this will appear in the subject line as html code. Don’t waste this valuable opportunity.

Good email design captures attention, facilitates information processing, augments the brand story and draws the eye to actionable sections of the template. Good content (defined as both the copy and images selected) capitalizes on attention, articulates value and outlines next steps.

Evaluate template processing patterns.

As we skim content, our eyes typically follow an “F” shaped path on the page. Designs that take this into consideration are easier for us to process and assess for value.

Use images wisely.

Our eye is naturally drawn to images, so make sure you’re being mindful about what they convey and where they’re directing attention. Images should support key messaging, enhance the perception of value, and draw the eye to towards actionable pieces of content.

Add value beyond offers.

If your program is light on non-promotional content pieces, find brand appropriate ways to connect with your audience beyond offers and conversion oriented messaging.

Segmentation is nothing new.

2018 should be the year that you examine your existing segmentation strategy. With new tools and technology available, advanced segmentation is becoming more accessible.

Email will continue to play an important role in digital marketing, however how email campaigns are implemented will be crucial in ensuring messages don’t get lost in the age of distraction.

It’s more important now than ever before to make sure that email campaigns resonate with target audiences, as if you don’t reach them within those first few seconds you may not reach them at all.